Dancing Queen - Gold

Gold coin from Mongolia
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  • 103.80 USD
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  • Economy: 5.80 USD
  • Priority: 13.60 USD
USA: Delivery time 10 days. 14 days return right. Payment options: Paypal or Banktransfer. For other countries please select the country above.

Dancing Queen - Gold

Gold coin from Mongolia
  • Item Number:
    22033
  • Material:
    Gold
  • Purity:
    .9999
  • Quality:
    Proof
  • Net Weight:
    1/25 oz
  • Diameter (mm):
    13.92
  • Issuing country:
    Mongolia
  • Year:
    2006
  • Package Content:
    Coin in plastic capsule, box and coin certificate
  • Design / Mint:
    CIT Coin Invest Trust AG / B.H. Mayer
  • Coin Value:
    1000 Togrog
  • Max. Mintage:
    25000
Buy now
  • 103.80 USD
In stock
VAT is not included in the price.

Delivery options for USA

  • Economy: 5.80 USD
  • Priority: 13.60 USD
USA: Delivery time 10 days. 14 days return right. Payment options: Paypal or Banktransfer. For other countries please select the country above.
A solid gold Mongolian coin that depicts an image of a woman ice-skating.
The dancing queen gold coin is a great addition to any collection. The coin depicts an image of a woman dancing on ice. The Dancing Queen coin is one of 3 coins in the Dancing Queen series that were issued to celebrate the sport of figure skating. Other coins in this series include the other gold and silver version of the coin that include a valuable diamond set at the crown of the figure skater. The coin is 13.92 mm in diameter, 1/25 oz. in weight, and was issued in 2006 in Mongolia. It is of proof gold quality, and has a purity of .9999. The coin comes complete with a protective plastic capsule, and coin certificate.

Figure skating was the first Olympic sport that was included in the Olympics in 1908. The four Olympic disciplines in figure skating are men’s singles, ladies singles, pair skating, and ice dancing. In figure skating many athletes perform jumps, spins, and lifts in synchronization to music while being scored by judges. While people have been ice skating for centuries, figure skating in its current form originated in the mid-19th century. 'A Treatise on Skating' (1772) by Englishman Robert Jones, is the first known account of figure skating. Competitions were then held in the 'English style' of skating, which was stiff and formal, and bears little resemblance to modern figure skating. American skater Jackson Haines, considered the 'father of modern figure skating', and introduced a new style of skating in the mid-1860s. This style, which incorporated free and expressive techniques, became known as the 'international style.' Although popular in Europe, Haines' style of skating was not widely adopted in the United States until long after his death.